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AHA MEDIA is very proud to learn how to scratch emulsion off of 16mm films from David Rimmer – Pioneer of Moving Images at Interurban Galley in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

March 30, 2010 Leave a comment

In the following photo and video, David Rimmer is showing April Smith of AHA MEDIA how to scratch emulsion off a strip of 16mm film at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

AHA MEDIA is currently learning from the Pioneer of Moving Images – the amazing David Rimmer! http://www.DavidRimmerFilm.com

This video was filmed by April Smith of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera – Panasonic DMC-ZS3. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilm

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In this video, April Smith of AHA MEDIA’s “scratch emulsion 16mm film” is being played on a Steenbeck at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

This video was filmed by April Smith of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera – Panasonic DMC-ZS3. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilms

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AHA MEDIA is very pleased to have ongoing rehearsals for our second performance of “Love In Shadows” – Shadow Theatre Play in Vancouver Downtown Eastside

March 16, 2010 Leave a comment

AHA MEDIA is very pleased to have ongoing rehearsals for our second performance of “Love In Shadows” – Shadow Theatre Play at the end of March at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside

AHA MEDIA cast and crew members were so encouraged by the very positive feedback by our audience from our first performance, we are continuing to do rehearsals in anticipation for our second performance.

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Below is a photo of AHA MEDIA’s cast and crew of  the second production of “Love in the Shadows”

Richard Czaban, Hugh Lampkin, Clyde Wright, Holly Boyd, Alvin Clayton and Alex Martin

AHA MEDIA wants to present a play with seven scenes based on true personal stories about how child abuse, trauma and sexual molestation can lead to some folks unable to deal with issues and may end up in the Vancouver Downtown Eastside trying to cope in a variety of harmful ways .

Warning – the following scene is considered graphic but is a real story that happened to some of our actors

This video was filmed by April Smith of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera Fujifilm S200EXR. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilms

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Below are thoughts from AHA MEDIA cast and crew and their thoughts on WHY they are presenting a graphic shadow play depicting Child Abuse scenes from their childhood to help inform people WHY some end up in the Vancouver Downtown Eastside and how they want to have a Harm Reduction project

This video was filmed by April Smith of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera – Panasonic DMC-ZS3. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilms

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AHA MEDIA believes “Love In The Shadows” can show the reasons WHY some people end up in the DTES – for the MEDIA, our friends and street folks. We wanted to help everyone remember us and our stories through visual and performing arts

AHA MEDIA is about doing positive community engagement and harm reduction strategies in our neighborhood through media, arts and now shadow theatre performances from our members.

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AHA MEDIA is very proud to have been mentioned in the Georgia Straight  by Stephen Hui from our first production in February

http://www.straight.com/article-294916/vancouver/downtown-eastside-media-makers-put-first-shadow-play

Downtown Eastside media makers to put on first shadow play

By Stephen Hui

A group of Downtown Eastside media makers will present its first shadow play on Saturday (February 27).

AHA Media will put on Love in the Shadows at the Downtown Eastside Community Arts Network’s art space (67 East Hastings Street) in the Lux hotel.

“AHA MEDIA wanted to present a play with six scenes based on true personal stories about how child abuse, trauma and sexual molestation can lead to some folks unable to deal with issues and may end up in the Vancouver Downtown Eastside trying to cope in a variety of harmful ways,” the group states on its Web site.

“AHA MEDIA believes our play can show the reasons WHY some people end up in the DTES – for the MEDIA, our friends and street folks.”

The show—starring Alvin ClaytonMike McNeeley, and Richard Czaban—starts at 7 p.m.

You can follow Stephen Hui on Twitter at twitter.com/stephenhui

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AHA MEDIA is proud to do our “Love in the Shadows” Play in great collaboration with DTES CAN – (DTES Community Arts Network)

AHA MEDIA is very pleased to learn how to create Experimental Film loops from Filmmaker David Rimmer – Pioneer of moving images at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside

March 11, 2010 Leave a comment

AHA MEDIA is very pleased to learn how to create Experimental Film loops from Filmmaker David Rimmer – Pioneer of moving images at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside

David Rimmer  http://www.DavidRimmerFilm.com

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Below is a photo of James Diamond, Frederick Cummings  learning to splice 16 mm films from our teacher David Rimmer 🙂

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In this video, April Smith of AHA MEDIA is helped by Frederick Cummings, James Diamond, Christoph Runne with stretching out a very long loop of 16mm film with our teacher David Rimmer sitting and looking on.

(No Audio in this video)

This video was filmed by Richard Czaban of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera Fujifilm S200EXR. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilms

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In this video, April Smith of AHA MEDIA learns how to splice 16mm film by Frederick Cummings, James Diamond, with our teacher David Rimmer sitting and looking on.

This video was filmed by Richard Czaban of AHA MEDIA on a New Media camera Fujifilm S200EXR. AHA MEDIA is about exploring mobile media production through New Media cameras. For a better quality version of this video, please DM April Smith @AprilFilms on Twitter or Facebook.com/AprilFilms

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In this photo, is Frederick Cummings with James Diamond making experimental film loops with 16mm films.

AHA MEDIA was very honored to meet Filmmaker David Rimmer – pioneer of experimental moving images at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

March 3, 2010 Leave a comment

AHA MEDIA was very honored to meet Filmmaker David Rimmer – pioneer of experimental moving images at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

http://www.DavidRimmerFilm.com

Born and raised in Vancouver, Rimmer graduated from the University of British Columbia with a B.A. in English Literature in 1967. Inspired by Stan Brakhage’s films and writings, he made his first important experimental films, Square Inch Field and Migration, in 1968 and 1969 respectively.

At the time the artist-run Intermedia Co-op in Vancouver and supportive individuals in the Vancouver offices of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) were providing Vancouver-based experimental filmmakers with access to surplus film, processing, optical printers and other post-production facilities. These filmmakers, Rimmer included, soon became part of the international experimental/avant-garde/underground film movement of the late ’60s and early ’70s.

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Below is our teacher Christoph Runne with David Rimmer

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Rimmer was also making film loops for performance pieces. This led to the production of several loop films, including what is probably his most widely seen film, Variations on a Cellophane Wrapper(1970), made from a short segment of an NFB documentary.

Below are some photos from his film: Variations on a Cellophane Wrapper(1970)

AHA MEDIA is very proud to help announce Filmmaker David Rimmer – pioneer of experimental moving images and his presentation at Interurban Gallery in Vancouver DTES at 7pm Tuesday March 2, 2010

March 2, 2010 Leave a comment

AHA MEDIA is very proud to help announce Filmmaker David Rimmer – pioneer of experimental moving images and his presentation at Interurban Gallery at 7pm Tuesday March 2, 2010

Below is a bio of David Rimmer from…

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/2009/book-reviews/loop-print-fade-flicker-david-rimmer’s-moving-images-by-mike-hoolboom-and-alex-mackenzie/

Born and raised in Vancouver, Rimmer graduated from the University of British Columbia with a B.A. in English Literature in 1967. Inspired by Stan Brakhage’s films and writings, he made his first important experimental films, Square Inch Field and Migration, in 1968 and 1969 respectively. At the time the artist-run Intermedia Co-op in Vancouver and supportive individuals in the Vancouver offices of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) were providing Vancouver-based experimental filmmakers with access to surplus film, processing, optical printers and other post-production facilities. These filmmakers, Rimmer included, soon became part of the international experimental/avant-garde/underground film movement of the late ’60s and early ’70s.

Rimmer was also making film loops for performance pieces. This led to the production of several loop films, including what is probably his most widely seen film, Variations on a Cellophane Wrapper(1970), made from a short segment of an NFB documentary. Found footage was also the source forThe Dance (1970), Seashore (1971), Surfacing on the Thames (1970) and Watching for the Queen(1973). In the last two, step printing reduces movement to a minimum, giving the viewer time to contemplate minute details in each frame of the film, including the changing patterns in the grains of emulsion. While Rimmer returned to found footage for a few later films such as As Seen On TV (1986) and Divine Mannequin (1989), he was also drawing upon his own filmed images of his West Coast environment – the ocean, the coastal forests and inlets – for personal, poetic films of subtle beauty and an introspective appreciation of the shapes, colours, textures and rhythms of nature. Narrows Inlet (1980) and Local Knowledge (1992) are notable examples. Rimmer also discovered fascinatingmise en scènes by setting up his camera at a window and periodically recording what transpired outside – in the street in front of a New York pizza parlour for Real Italian Pizza (1971) and in a Vancouver railroad yard with water and mountains in the background for Canadian Pacific I (1974) and Canadian Pacific II (1975). Taking a very different tack, Rimmer made Al Neil: A Portrait in 1979. It was the first of nearly a dozen films that perhaps can be best categorised as experimental documentaries. Since 2002, he has been hand-painting frames of 35mm film for works released on video, best represented by An Eye for an Eye (2003). Rimmer’s oeuvre of nearly 50 films and videos also includes works shot and released on video, as well as pieces prepared for gallery presentations.

Because of their variety of techniques, genres and subject matter, Rimmer’s films and videos defy the usual critical and scholarly efforts to label and generalise about an artist’s work as a whole. Much of his film work of the 1970s falls within the parameters of the structural and structural-materialist films that dominated experimental filmmaking during that decade, and a select group of his films can be placed in the category of “landscape films” (1). But, as Catherine Russell observed in a 1993 essay (to which I will return), “The body of Rimmer’s work…is a fragmented and historical text” (2). That “text”, which has continued to grow in variety as well as in number of “fragments” since Russell’s essay appeared, has not yet received the kind of critical attention accorded the work of other major Canadian experimental filmmakers, such as Michael Snow, Joyce Wieland and Jack Chambers. WhileLoop, Print, Fade + Flicker provides a useful introduction to Rimmer and his work, it does not provide the detailed critical study that Rimmer’s accomplishments as a film artist deserve.

AHA MEDIA is proud to help announce the InterUrban Gallery opening of Far, Up Close on February 12 for the duration of the Winter Games in Vancouver Downtown Eastside

February 11, 2010 Leave a comment

A Flickering light in the heart of darkness

Multimedia art show opens in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside


Vancouver
, BC—In the heart of Vancouver’s infamous Downtown Eastside, the InterUrban Gallery opens Far, Up Close on February 12 for the duration of the Winter Games. The show is made up of a number of multi-media works, providing a flickering counterpoint to the darkness, real and over-hyped, surrounding it.

  • Where: 1 East Hastings St. (Google map)
  • When: February 12 to March 21, Gallery Hours: Wed to Sun, 12 to 5pm; Window Projections: dusk to dawn

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“The media makes the Downtown Eastside out to be such a dark place,” says artist Christoph Runne. “In some ways, that is true. But this is also a place of community and people with stories to tell. We wanted to show that.”

Below is a photo of one of Christoph Runne’s portraits

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Far, Up Close includes works by Chris Welsby, Christoph Runne, Faith Moosang and Monique Mees
Chris Welsby’s Time After, a five-monitor new media landscape, is neither a movie, nor a photograph. It takes high-speed communications technology and slows it down to planetary speed. Revealing hitherto unnoticed atmospheric shifts and subtle changes in light and color, it turns the city into a landscape and places human activity within the larger time scale of the natural world.

Christoph Runne’s Portraits combines classical portraiture with overt allusions to Dutch masters, turn-of –the-century anthropological photography and police mug shots. Projected on the gallery’s windows, Portraits creates a spectral permanence for the residents of Vancouver’s most disputed neighbourhood.

Faith Moosang and Christoph Runne’s film installation, The Blair Bush Project, looks at the glamourization of warfare and suggests that there is a correlation between beauty and horror.

Monique Mees’ photographic series Specimen Plates exposes the visual culture of medicine by addressing the historical use of cinema in medical science to analyze, regulate and reconfigure the transient and uncontrollable human body.

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ARTIST BIOS


Chris Welsby

Chris Welsby is a graduate of the Experimental Media Department at the Slade School of Fine Art, University of London UK. He is currently Professor of Film and Digital Media at Simon Fraser University Vancouver and a member of ICICS (Institute for Computing, Information, and Cognitive Systems) at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Showing internationally since the early 1970s, his work has ranged across several media, but always concentrating on this central theme: how do we see ourselves in relation to the natural world and how should we position ourselves and our technologies within it?

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Christoph Runné is a Vancouver-based experimental film, video, and installation artist. Through his work, he explores the unhidden yet seemingly invisible world around us. He creates visual tone poems with a humanitarian heartbeat whose minimalist and impressionistic methodology contradicts the complex human conditions with which Runné engages.

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Faith Moosang graduated from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and has received her MFA from Simon Fraser University’s School for the Contemporary Arts. Her work, while largely based in photography, has also included installations using video and film. She has shown in group and solo exhibitions in Canada, the United States and Europe. She is fixated on the constructed visuality of warfare and its mediation to and by the public at large.

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Monique Mees graduated with honors from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in 1987. She pursued a scholarship in Germany at the Staatliche Der Bildenden Kunste, Karlsruhe, where she studied painting and has since developed a multi-interdisciplinary practice.  Mees has  received numerous cultural grants from both the Canada Council and the BC Art Council for her work, which has been shown both nationally and internationally.

Megaphone launches special Olympic issue: “Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside: A People’s History” on Wed Feb 3, 2010 – 11AM to 1PM, Interurban Galley

February 1, 2010 3 comments

Olympic Issue Launch event

Megaphone launches special issue: “Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside: A People’s History”

Wednesday Feb 3, 2010, 11 AM – 1PM, Interurban Gallery

http://www.MegaphoneMagazine.com

With the eyes of the world on Vancouver for the Winter Olympics, residents of the city’s Downtown Eastside will have a unique opportunity to dispel the negative stereotypes of their historic, but troubled, neighbourhood.

Megaphone, a magazine sold on the streets of Vancouver by homeless and low-income vendors, is launching a special, double-issue on the Downtown Eastside at the Interurban Gallery on Wednesday, February 3rd at 11 a.m. Entitled “Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside: A People’s History”, the issue aims to change the perception of the neighbourhood and the people that populate it.

“There are a lot of unfortunate stereotypes about the Downtown Eastside,” says Megaphone’s editor-in-chief, Sean Condon. “Many people have a tough time seeing beyond the drug use and poverty. But if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find a community bursting with spirit and compassion.”

The commemorative issue features stories on neighbourhood successes like the United We Can bottle depot, which provides both economic and environmental benefits to the city, and the Hope In Shadows calendar project, which shows the community’s strong spirit. It also features articles from vendors and Downtown Eastside residents about their lives and the tremendous barriers they’ve overcome.

Speaking at the event will be Sean Condon, Irwin Oostindie, executive director of W2 (an organization profiled in this issue) and Dalannah Gail Bowen (who is the executive director of the Downtown Eastside Centre for the Arts and is a member of editorial advisory board for this special issue).

Megaphone vendors will be in attendance to pick up issues and new Megaphone carrier bags. They will also be available to speak to the media.

The magazine’s launch will be held on Wednesday, February 3rd at the Interurban Gallery (1 E. Hastings) at 11 a.m. The event will be open to the public and will include snacks and drinks.