Archive

Archive for the ‘Harm Reduction’ Category

Dr. Peter Ferentzy, PhD Crackhead speaks on Ending Drug Prohibition and Emancipating the Addict – the Last Frontier in a Struggle for Enlightenment in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

January 29, 2012 Leave a comment

Peter Ferentzy holds a Ph.D. in Social and Political Thought from York University. His dissertation is a historical sociology of the origins and recent development of the modern concept of addiction with an emphasis on how it has interacted with ideas about mental illness and compulsions in general.

Dr. Ferentzy has studied and written extensively on Gamblers Anonymous, as well as other issues related to pathological gambling. His two most recently completed studies involve: 1.  The history of ideas related to addiction with an emphasis on problem gambling wherein special attention is paid to the role of metaphoric conceptualization in the construction of scientific discourse; 2.  A street level, ethnographic study of gambling patterns among crack users in downtown Toronto. 

Peter Ferentzy is a recovering drunk and a recovering crackhead. He knows this topic from the gutter right up to the halls of academe. After losing two friends to overdose, and seeing clearly that in each case the governing approach to addiction was the cause, Peter wrote Dealing with Addiction — Why the 20th Century was Wrong. Peter wants to change things, and is arrogant enough to believe that he can.

Please see more at Peter’s website and book

Knowledge Exchange on Homelessness and Health in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

November 13, 2011 Leave a comment

Welcome and blessing: Sam George

Dr Stephen Hwang – Research Scientist at the Centre for Research on Innet City Health at St. Michael’s Hospital “Canadian Crisis – the Hidden Cost of Homelessness”

Dr. Anita Palepu – UBC Associate Member, General Internal Medicine

Tom Laviolette – Director of Project Development, PHS Community Services Society

Laura Cowan – Executive Director, Street Health Community Nursing Foundation, Toronto

Michael Shapcott – Wellesley Institute, Toronto

 Sean Spear – Associate Director, RainCity Housing

 Meghan Thumath – Vancouver Coastal Health Clinical Practice Initiatives Lead, HIV/AIDS “Impact on Homelessness on HIV/AIDS and Approaches to Care and Treatment”

 Craig Crawford (Acting) Vice President of Operations, BC Housing

 Dr Bruce MacLaurin – Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, U of C “Preventing Homelessness: Developing the Homelessness Asset & Risk Tool (HART) Bruce MacLaurin on behalf of the HART Research Team”

Wendy Muckle – Executive Director, Ottawa Inner City Health “Understanding What Works – Breaking Down Barriers to Housing and Healthy Living for Women

Liz Evans – Executive Director, PHS Community Services Society “SIS: Fight for Change

NAOMI RESEARCH SURVIVORS: EXPERIENCES AND RECOMMENDATIONS in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

November 9, 2011 Leave a comment

NAOMI RESEARCH SURVIVORS: EXPERIENCES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

08 November · 19:00 – 20:30

Location

World Art Centre, 2nd Floor, SFU Woodward’s Campus, 149 West Hastings, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts

NAOMI HEROIN ASSISTED TREATMENT RESARCH SURVIVORS: EXPERIENCES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

 

In January 2011, Dave Murray organized a group of participants from the NAOMI heroin assisted treatment research study in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.

The NAOMI Patients Association (NPA) meets every Saturday at Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU). Shortly after NPA began to meet, they decided to work towards conducting their own research about their experiences as NAOMI research subjects. They were particularly interested in recording their experiences during and following NAOMI and making recommendations for future heroin and drug substitution research experiments and programs.

Being the only contemporary “research participants” in North America to receive heroin maintenance, they believe that they have unique knowledge about the NAOMI projectand its impact on the lives of those addicted.

The recommendations for future projects and programs are drawn from lived experiences.

The following presentation draws from these focus groups and NPA meetings.

Panel presenters:

Chair: Donald MacPherson, Director of Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, former City of Vancouver Drug Policy Coordinator

Panel:

Dave Murray, founder of NPA

Dianne Tobin, Vice-President of VANDU and member of NPA

Jewl Chapman, Member of VANDU and NPA

Susan Boyd, Professor, University of Victory, drug policy researcher

 

Hendrik Beune of AHA MEDIA meets Donald MacPherson of Canadian Drug Policy Coaliton (CDPC) in Vancouver

October 16, 2011 Leave a comment

Hendrik Beune of AHA MEDIA and Donald MacPherson of Canadian Drug Policy (CDPC) share a smile together in Vancouver!

Donald is drug policy change agent that believes a new paradigm is necessary that puts human rights, saving lives and public health first

CDPC is a broad based network of organizations, associations and individuals working together to develop drug policy and legislation based on evidence, human rights, social inclusion and public health in Canada.

Historical Day of Legal Victory for InSite! Supreme Court of Canada allows InSite to stay Open in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

October 6, 2011 Leave a comment

Historical Day for InSite! Supreme Court of Canada allows InSite to stay Open in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

“WE WON!!!!”

Friday Sept 30, 2011 at Insite; 6:30am – Be among the first to hear the results of the Supreme Court Ruling in Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES)

September 29, 2011 Leave a comment

Join us this Friday, 6:30am, at Insite; Vancouver’s Supervised Injection Site, at 139 East Hastings St. to be among the first to hear the results of the Supreme Court of Canada’s Decision regarding Insite.

Coffee and Muffins will be on-hand, as it will be an early morning. Try to come by on your way to work.

In our neighbourhood, a small but unique project called Insite, exists. It is the result of the incredible efforts of many people in our community and in our City, and in our Province. Many individuals, groups, academics and researchers who have come together and fought for it to exist, and fought for its continued existence, for over a decade now.

This isn’t just about a building or an initiative in the Downtown Eastside. It’s about systemic and National change in our approach to people who suffer from addiction.

This Friday morning, a enormous decision will be announced determining whether or not Insite can stay open, indicating the direction our Country is heading in, in terms of the future for people living with addiction.

On May 12th 2011, the Canadian Supreme Court heard the Federal Government appeal of the previous BC Supreme Court rulings that Insite is protected under section 7 of Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Province of BC’s constitutional jurisdiction over health care, in supporting this vital primary health care facility.

Up until now, we have said that our country has no room for people struggling with life as an active addict. People who suffer intense pain, who have been branded as criminals, due to the arbitrary distinction made between addictive substances such as alcohol and cigarettes, or cocaine and heroin.

This group of people, to whom we are all connected – are our family members, our friends, and our loved ones and our neighbours. They are currently treated like animals, and can die as a result of being  “thrown out”.

We have collectively told them, that unless you are clean…. Your life does not matter. You will be denied housing and services.  It’s OK if you die of a drug overdose, it’s OK if you get an infectious disease, it’s OK if you live on the street, get beaten up, get HIV or hepatitis C, or go to jail.

This is our humanistic Canadian Society.  For the drug addict, it is anything but humane.

I believe in 30 years we will look back in disbelief at the lack of wisdom we have shown in our policies surrounding some of our Society’s most fragile and sick individuals who are not accessing proper treatment, dignity or care.

Insite is only one very tiny piece of what’s needed to put the puzzle into place, but it is an icon of real systemic change. Insite communicates the message to the drug user that your life is worth saving and that your life is worth living.  That we believe in you as a human being, in spite of the fact that you are injecting drugs into your body.

It is a symbol of hope for our collective humanity.

If Insite wins this Supreme Court ruling we will be sending a message of hope to thousands of people across the country to say that we care about them. We care enough to keep them alive, to bring them in off the streets, to provide them with access to nursing supports, access to treatment and detox, and life saving interventions. Insite saves people’s lives and connects them into a mainstream array of supports and care.

This will be a victory for all of us as Canadians, and it will signal a new direction for our Country, by turning against the simplistic paradigms of the past that have convinced so many that quitting an addiction is just as simple as saying No. Not only has this belief led to enormous suffering, it has misinformed policy, and allowed politicians to avoid making the right decisions. People who live addicted to illicit substances are people.

If we lose this fight, Insite will be none-the-less relevant. We will continue to call upon the Federal Government of this country, who just need to provide a simple letter to keep it open…We will ask our Prime Minister, and our Federal Minister of Health, to grant an exemption for Insite – We will ask that they listen to the millions of dollars worth of scientific evidence, the local experts, the merchants, the doctors, the nurses and the people of Vancouver and British Columbia, including the Premier of British Columbia and the past five Mayors of Vancouver representing every political stripe, to allow Insite’s life saving work to continue.

To quote Dean Wilson, one of the plaintiffs in the original BC Supreme Court case. “Insite will not be closed. Insite, as well as the comprehensive Onsite treatment program that includes the 30 recovery beds on the two floors above Insite, have both saved my life and put me on the path to recovery. There is no way that myself and the thousands of members of my community are going to let the positive impact of this facility end.”

A broad based coalition of community members including church groups, doctors and nurses, local merchants and civic and provincial officials will attempt to contact Stephen Harper to make certain he is aware of the literal life-and-death consequences of the action before him.

In the event that the Supreme Court rule against Insite, “Stephen Harper will have an important choice before him,” said fellow plaintiff Shelly Tomic. “He can choose life – or he can choose death for thousands of Canadians suffering while struggling to overcome their addiction.”

You are welcome to pop by this Friday morning, to await the decision of the Supreme Court of Canada, which we will have via a live link.

Liz Evans
Executive Director
PHS Community Services Society

With Glowing Hearts – The Movie Theatrical Screening in Vancouver – Sat Sept 24 7pm

September 24, 2011 Leave a comment

Time
24 September · 19:00 – 22:00

Location
SFU Woodward’s
149 W Hastings

Vancouver, British Columbia

Created by:
Jon Ornoy, Andrew Lavigne

More info
It’s the WGH cross-Canada screening series! Here’s your chance to see our little movie up on the big screen in a city near you. Each show will be preceded by a photo display in the the theatre lobby from photographer Kris Krug. After the film stick around for a Q+A with producer Jon Ornoy. Tickets on sale now online (wghvancouver.eventbrite.com), or at the door.

You can watch the trailer at youtube.com/wghthemovie

The social network is replacing the broadcast network as the place where the world gets its news. From the Ukraine to the Mid East and everywhere in between, people are turning on to new ways of tuning in, and joining this emerging media democracy. With Glowing Hearts is a film about Social Media in action; its power to represent, inspire and break down the digital divide.

In February 2010, the Winter Olympics stormed through Vancouver, along with 5,000 international media assigned to cover the Games. At these Games, record numbers of residents, activists and fans used their blogs, video-streaming cellphones and the Internet to connect, engage and tell the story like never before. Centered on an unlikely initiative coming out of the city’s most impoverished and maligned neighborhood to create the Games’ first dedicated Social Media center, the film offers viewers an exclusive glimpse into a potent melding of technology, activism and passion

Below is a photo of Jon Ornoy, Andrew Lavigne, Garvin Snider, April Smith and Irwin Oostindie

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 74 other followers